Hills, hollows, and a lack of improved roads meant isolation for the mines and coal patch towns of Kentucky well into the 20th century. For those miners not living in company housing, getting to work could mean walking miles to the mine where they worked and then home again after a long day of physically exhausting work underground. Early on the rivers, and later the railroads, were the main means of travel between towns. Blaine Sergent, coal loader, on his way home after work. Lejunior, Harlan County, Kentucky. 1946. Kentuckiana Digital Library. #minerslife #foolingourselves #itwasnevereasy

Hills, hollows,  and a lack of improved roads meant isolation for the mines and coal patch towns of Kentucky well into the 20th century.  For those miners not living in company housing, getting to work could mean walking miles to the mine where they worked and then home again after a long day of physically exhausting work underground. Early on the rivers, and later the railroads, were the main means of travel between towns. Blaine Sergent, coal loader, on his way home after work. Lejunior, Harlan County, Kentucky. 1946. Kentuckiana Digital Library. #minerslife #foolingourselves #itwasnevereasy
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